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full party
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2013/02/25
7:12am
asusena Armenia
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What does full party mean? Today one student used it in her dialogue in the meaning of “a big party with lot’s of people present and having great fun”.

 Is that the real meaning of it? Is “full party” used frequently in colloquial speech?

Perhaps it would have been better to use  “the party was in full swing”……  No?

 

2013/02/25
10:08am
Glenn
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I think it would be better for you to present a full sentence when you have such queries. It is a little hard to guess the context and make suggestions for improvement.

My natural reaction to the phrase “full party” would be that there was limited space available, and the number of people had met or exceeded the available space, and that nobody else could enter. A “full-on party” would mean that the people were really having a good time. It could also be used with other modifiers:
A full-on dance party
A full-on super-bowl party

Maybe not a full-on Tupperware party.

“They were in full party mode.” This would also suggest a lot of fun.

And, as you suggest, “The party was in full swing” would also do the trick.

2013/02/25
2:20pm
Robert
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I hear full-on…, but ‘full party’ doesn’t ring any bell.

2013/02/27
7:55am
asusena Armenia
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Glenn said
I think it would be better for you to present a full sentence when you have such queries. It is a little hard to guess the context and make suggestions for improvement. ….

 

Yeah, I should have presented the full sentence where “full party” was used. Language is context-sensitive, but, as I mentioned earlier, one of the students had used it in her dialogue at the English lesson in a sentence like “We had a full party yesterday”. I just can’t remember the full context now. But when I heard it, I felt that it was not a right way to speak or rather an impossible collocation, and asked her to clarify what she meant by saying “a full party”. There followed the answer that it is a common way of speaking now and by full party she meant the one    with lot’s of people present and having great fun. I just forgot to ask her where she had heard it from.

Now I got it, Glenn. Thank you for clarifying that.

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