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Or similar?
Is it indicative of a dialect pattern ?
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2 spies meeting in secret, both filled with mutual mistrusts–

‘You’re not being clever, are you? Like, you haven’t got a photographer tucked round the corner, or similar?’

It seems that the author is purposely using ‘or similar?‘ for realism- to invoke how someone sounds who is Anglo but not American or English- perhaps an Irishman, or one or another of Her Majesty’s non-British subjects.

Am I right about that?

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Being an Anglo (now living in the US), I can’t say I’ve thought about it, but I’m sure I used to say something like that, or similar! I don’t think it’s anything I’d usually see written so agree with you that it’s used purposely. It does get the mind thinking about what other nefarious activities the spy might be up to.

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