spizerinctum n. energy, vigor, or vitality. Also spizerinktum, spizzerinktum, spizzerinctum, spizarinctum, pizzeringtum, spizzer inktum, etc. Editorial Note: The ladies club mentioned in the cites seems to have taken its name from the term, which has existed in one spelling or another since at least as early as 1845. Etymological Note: As Merriam-Webster editors have pointed out in their May 2005 newsletter, it has been speculated “that the word derives in whole from Latin specie rectum, literally, ‘the right kind’—but that etymology appears to be a misguided attempt to make something more of good old American slang than is warranted.” (source: Double-Tongued Dictionary)

5 Responses

  1. I remember my grandmother, who was born in 1883, using this word in an expression to describe someone who was highly excitable, etc.  She used the phrase as “Having high perk of the spizerinktum.”
    On another note, her senior yearbook at her high school in 1913 was called “The Spizerinktum”

  2. bob wayne says:

    I never use ground meat but always hand cut a couple of chuck roasts. In addition, I have my own spice mixture consisting of cumin, ground dried red chilies, onion, garlic, and whole fresh jalapenos. The secret is to cook down the meat until it breaks down and the liquid is the consistency of gravy.

  3. My understanding of the definition of the word, “spizerinctum” is: the
    will to succeed

      Earl D. Bolen
      dbolen888@msn.com

  4. Joel Biggers says:

    My father used the word regularly to define a sports team that was not playing up to their potential. He would say, “the boys (or girls) need more spizerinctum tonight.” This would fit with the “will to succeed” definition.

  5. Spizzerinctum: “The Will to Succeed” 

    Syns:  Vim, Vigor, Vitality, Energy, Ambition

    I wrote a book on LEADERSHIP SUCCESS entitled: SPIZZERINCTUM SPEAKS OUT ON LEADERSHIP SUCCESS

    Without SPIZZERINCTUM, there is no Leadership Success

Leave a Reply