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bit vs. bitten
My husband and I think that these may often be interchangeable, but when using "got," what form of bite do you use. >>I would not like it if you got bit Or >>I would not like it is you got bitten.?
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2014/06/27
7:23pm
heidejo
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Bit vs. bitten

My husband and I think that these may often be interchangeable, but when using “got,” what form of bite do you use.
>>I would not like it if you got bit
Or
>>I would not like it if you got bitten?

2014/06/27
7:58pm
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deaconB
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If I were writing it, you were bitten, but orally,I’m much less careful of my words. Siince oral probably is ten or twenty times as common as written, I’d have difficulty damning either of the “got”  usages.  The language belongs to those who use it, and elegant or not, the meaning is not unclear.

Unless, of course, she was working with tack, in which case “got bit” id an errand rather than a mishap, and the use of an article before “bit” would be customary.

2014/06/29
8:41pm
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KiheBard
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The most common usage in my experience would be for “I got bit” or “I got bitten”;

referring to someone else, “you were bitten” or much more rarely, in direct speech addressed to an individual, “you got bit”.

2014/06/30
11:07am
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Glenn
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Personally, I would even say “I have gotten bitten” or “I got bitten.” Only in very informal contexts would I say “I got bit (by a spider).”

Still, this is clearly a matter of dialect, and we are not, as a language group entirely consistent on this matter — c.f. (boughten) / bought vs. chosen / (chose). I associate a greater use of short forms of the -en participles with British English, but also with several American English dialects as well. Many sources list them as alternates, and there are lots of examples, some much more familiar than others.

beaten / beat
bidden / bid
bitten / bit
(boughten) / bought
chosen / (chose)
drunken / drunk
forgotten / forgot
gotten / got
hidden / hid
ridden / rid
shrunken / shrunk
spoken / spoke
sunken / sunk
written / (writ)

And more.

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