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non-certificated
2013/11/24
7:12am
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deaconB
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Is there a difference between non-certificated and non-certified?

Ohio public schools use “non-certificated” to distinguish between licensed educators and other employees.   I’m not sure why they don’t use “unlicensed”, but I suppose the janitor is licensed to operate a low pressure steam boiler.

I’m partial to the UK definition of a professional as a self-employed person who professes expertise, and who dispenses advice to a clientele according to a code of ethics.   He’s allowed to give hus advice on paper, which means CPAs, lawyers, and diagnosticians are professionals, but a surgeon is a tradesman.   And I’d extend the “professional” term to staff attorneys, etc., as they are in a professional trade.

But educators are rarely paid fees by their students. They are no more professionals than entertainers who throw around balls, so “professional staff” seems little better.

But shouldn’t teachers be certified, not certificated, if they are literate?   (or should I say literatalicized?)

 

2013/11/24
12:37pm
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Dick
Fort Worth, TX
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Your UK definition does not mention who pays the professional or if they are paid at all.   Teachers are paid by representatives of their clients.

I don’t really think the UK definition is broad enough.   I say all this without consulting a dictionary, American or British.   I think anyone who is paid legal tender for their services is a professional.   This way you can have professional athletes, entertainers or prostitutes as opposed to amateurs in each of these fields. And without a doubt, teachers are professionals.

As to your other question, I agree.   I think certified and certificated are the same thing.   I would eliminate “certificated” if I were the one with that power.   However, certified does not equal licensed.   They probably overlap but a license comes from a legal entity and a certificate usually comes from an educational institution. You’ll run into many misuses of “certified,” like the mechanic that “certifies” your car’s condition. The word warranty or guarantee would fit here better.

2013/11/25
4:35am
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deaconB
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Dick said
Your UK definition does not mention who pays the professional or if they are paid at all.   Teachers are paid by representatives of their clients.

I don’t really think the UK definition is broad enough.   I say all this without consulting a dictionary, American or British.   I think anyone who is paid legal tender for their services is a professional.   This way you can have professional athletes, entertainers or prostitutes as opposed to amateurs in each of these fields. And without a doubt, teachers are professionals.

As to your other question, I agree.   I think certified and certificated are the same thing.   I would eliminate “certificated” if I were the one with that power.   However, certified does not equal licensed.   They probably overlap but a license comes from a legal entity and a certificate usually comes from an educational institution. You’ll run into many misuses of “certified,” like the mechanic that “certifies” your car’s condition. The word warranty or guarantee would fit here better.

 

As a rule, teachers do not receive fee-based compensation.   They are salaried.

If you describe professional as “anyone who is paid legal tender for their services”,   the word loses all meaning.   What does “professional ethics” mean as when it comes to child pornographers?   What constitutes the “professional practice” of a coal miner?

If you are paid for athletic teamwork, you are a commercial entertainer.   That’s not an insult, it is a fair description. Commerce is a good thing.   Craftsmen and tradesmen are to be honored.   The most dangerous job in municipal government is not policeman.   Firemen are far likely to be injured or killed in their jobs, but the highest rate of injury, disability and death goes to the trash collector.   Give them respect and honor, yes, but they are blue-collar workers, not professionals

A professional is one who professes.   There is no synonym. Mark Twain said that he bought cigars at $5 a barrel, and when he was ill, his doctor told him to give up smoking.   Good thing he smoked, for he knew a man with no bad habits to give up, and who died as a result.   We need to protect sand defend words like “literally” and “professional” or someday, we won’t have those tools at our disposal.  

A warranty or guarantee assumes liability to make things right. When a mechanic issues a certificate, he risks his reputation, but not his wallet.

2013/11/25
1:49pm
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EmmettRedd
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deaconB said

A professional is one who professes.  

I wrote the following almost 10 years ago.

Academic Rank Definitions:

Professor–Someone who professes to know something.

Associate Professor–Someone who associates with those who professor to know something.

Assistant Professor–Someone who assists those who profess to know something.

Lecturer–Someone who lectures but does not necessairly profess to know anything.

laugh