juniorization
 n.— «The survey spawned a terrible new word: juniorization. It covers a multitude of sins. When more experienced reporters left the profession because they were traumatized by covering the political violence that swept the country in the 1980s, or crime or AIDS in the 1990s; when talented reporters get snatched up at double their salaries by government or corporations as spinmeisters; when someone gets promoted beyond his abilities, and even when a reporter gets a story wrong, “juniorization” is the one-size-fits-all label used to shame newsroom denizens without mentioning explicitly that most of the “juniors” are black.» —“Letter From Johannesburg: The Trouble with Transformation” by Douglas Foster in Cape Town, S. Africa Columbia Journalism Review Oct., 2004. (source: Double-Tongued Dictionary)