Hi!

In the latest episode of “A Way with Words,” it’s the day jobs of famous writers. We also discuss Eskimo kisses, the Puerto Rican treat called a “limber,” how “fail” became a noun, “I’m efforting that,” the term “chester drawers,” and where you throw a houlihan:

http://www.waywordradio.org/chester-drawers/

One call prompted a huge response: Kathy from Racine, Wis., told us her father and his co-workers pronounced “schedule” as “skeh-DOO-lee.” Many of you told us you heard this from your parents, and suspect it has German roots. Others guessed it’s from an old-time radio show. We’re on the case, so stay tuned!

Also in the mailbag this week, some excellent anagrams from Philadelphia listener Jeffrey Solow:

SNOOZE ALARM anagrams to ALAS! NO MORE Z’S

ELEVEN PLUS TWO anagrams to TWELVE PLUS ONE

And perfect for this time of year:

ELECTION RESULTS anagrams to LIES — LET’S RECOUNT

Thanks, Jeffrey!

Is David Sedaris “the funniest and most original American writer since SJ Perelman”? Bill Bryson thinks so, according to a long article in “The Guardian” about Sedaris and his career.

http://bit.ly/b8ZPBN

Speaking of popular writers, want to sleep in Agatha Christie’s house? You can. Really. An essay from the author of the forthcoming book, “A Skeptic’s Guide to Writers’ Houses,” about the sometimes questionable practice of preserving writers’ homes for posterity:

http://nyti.ms/aTjlGS

Curious about famous writers toiling at other jobs? Check out “Don’t Quit Your Day Job: What the Famous Did that Wasn’t,” by literary historian Jack Lynch. More about this light, inspiring read, plus a quick quiz about famous people’s day jobs, here:

http://bit.ly/aT4oXe

By the way, ever notice how A WAY WITH WORDS anagrams to AWARD SHOWY WIT? Hmmmm. More fun with anagrams:

http://wordsmith.org/anagram/

Have a great week,

Martha and Grant

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