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Fillet and Flay

You can tell someone’s an A Way with Words listener when they confess to lying awake at night wondering about questions like, “Are the words fillet and flay etymologically related?” This is part of a complete episode.

jumpseat

jumpseat  v.— «Someone at my company was jumpseating on FedEx and he said the crew told him he was on a flight that would do what was known as sweeps. Staying in the air for about an extra hour in case a plane broke down somewhere at an...

hot

hot  adj.— «UPS has “hot” crews at maybe five or six airports across the country. There is one in ONT, DFW, RFD, SDF, PHL, and probably a few others. The crews show up, preflight the plane, and then are on a 30 minute launch...

sweep

sweep  n.— «Someone at my company was jumpseating on FedEx and he said the crew told him he was on a flight that would do what was known as sweeps. Staying in the air for about an extra hour in case a plane broke down somewhere at an...

he-vage

he-vage  n.— «The question is: how much of his chest—or “he-vage”—should a man reveal when he’s wearing a shirt?» —“How much he-vage should a man show?” by Ursula Hirschkorn Daily Mail (United...

whimperative

whimperative  n.— «The whimperative and the impositive are polite ways of commanding or requesting through indirection. Sadock states: “Every language provides subtle and not-so-subtle means of encoding information about the...