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vuzvuz

vuzvuz  n.— «Speaking of pejoratives, have you heard the term “vuzvuz” applied to Ashkenazim? Apparently derived from the frequent use of “vus? vus?” in Yiddish. I am not sure that there is any real insult attached...

tsorres

tsorres  n.— «Our citizens, despite their own “tsorres” (a Yiddish word meaning misfortune) have opened their hearts to help others less fortunate.» —“Town Talk: Searching for the ‘good among the ‘bad’” by Anne...

utzy

utzy adj. uncomfortable, bothered, uneasy. Etymological Note: Probably from the Yiddish utz ‘to tease, bother, nag,’ related to the German uzen ‘to tease, to kid,’ and perhaps reinforced by antsy. (source: Double-Tongued Dictionary)

tutzuch

tutzuch  n.— «“What is a hocker?” With some deliberation, he answered me, “A hocker is…the same as a tutzuch.”» —“Finalizing…” by Yuda Welcome to the yudaSphere (N.Y.) June 3...

hocker

hocker n. a person who harangues, beseeches, or talks persuasively; a person who trades in information, gossip, or personal connections; someone who is (obnoxiously) ambitious. Editorial Note: Hocker is common and well-known to yeshiva students in...

hocker

hocker  n.— «The father’s self-representation as Hocker confirms the son’s characterization of him, in which an authorial Roth reaches for a recognizable, if not entirely appealing, type glossed for the goyim. The writer supplies the...