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Bailiwick

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If something’s not in your bailiwick, it’s not in your jurisdiction or area of control. But what exactly is a “bailiwick”? Martha explains that the two words which make up the term — bailiff and wick — have specific meanings in Middle English. A bailiff, in the time of kings, was “a public minister of a district,” and a wick was simply a “town” or “village.” For example, Gatwick literally referred to a “goat village.” And Greenwich literally meant “green village” or “village on the green.” This is part of a complete episode.

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